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Putting it together quiz

 

 

 

A brief quiz to help recap what you’ve encountered along the way! (Some suggested answers are provided at the end.)

 

1. List three needs that patients have in caring conversations.

 

2.When faced with conflicting demands it’s helpful to feel clear about your priorities. List four priorities in ascending order – the top one being your number one.

 

3.What is mentalising?

a)  A physical illness or other condition caused or intensified by a mental issue.

b)  The skill of being aware of what’s happening in our own minds and in other people’s minds.

c)  The avoidance of difficult thoughts and feelings, believing that this would be helpful for patients with physical problems.

4. What are some typical characteristics of emotionally vulnerable patients?

 

5. How would you describe ‘closed questions’?

 

6. Can you think of two useful questions for checking understanding?

 

7. What are three benefits of using humour with patients?

 

8. Which of the following examples of staff behaviour go beyond the acceptable boundaries of the caring relationship?

a) Giving the patient her partner’s and relatives names then discussing her private life and relationships

b) Disclosing that they have had successful treatment for a similar condition.

c) Seeing a person in their care outside normal practice

d) Visiting a patient’s home unannounced and without an appointment

9. How might you sensitively end a conversation with a patient?

 

10. What are some ways of creatively conversing with patients who have additional communication challenges?

 

11. Can you think of two symptoms of psychosis?

 

12. A helpful approach and an aid to memory for staff when working with patients diagnosed with dementia is VERA: The ‘V’ stands for Validate and the ‘E’ for Emotion. What does the ‘R’ and ‘A’ stand for?

 

13. What are some of the things that help patients with a personality disorder to feel safe and supported?

 

14. Which of the following can managers do to help create a great workplace?

a) Be open and transparent

b) Create a truly no-blame culture

c) Make sure staff spend most of their time doing what they are best at

d) Discourage responsibility and ownership

 

 

Some suggested answers

 

1.       List three patient’s needs in caring conversations.

  • Someone to be interested in them as an individual, not just as a patient.
  • To feel able to trust a member of staff so they can rely on them for emotional support, information and human contact.
  • To have a bit of a natter to relieve what can often feel like long and empty hours in hospital.

 

2.       When faced with conflicting demands it’s helpful to feel clear about your priorities. List four priorities in ascending order – the top one being your number one. 

  • Safety
  • Empathy
  • Clinical tasks
  • Paperwork

 

3.       What is mentalising?

B. The skill of being aware of what’s happening in our own minds and in other people’s minds.

 

4.       What are some typical characteristics of emotionally vulnerable patients?

  • Frightened, confused, anxious
  • In pain
  • Depressed
  • Fearing breaking down or losing control
  • Afraid of being stigmatized if they admit their fears and needs
  • Vulnerable because they can’t communicate
  • Living with a diagnosis of mental illness.

 

5.       How would you describe ‘closed questions’?

A closed question classically produces a one word answer. They might start with ‘are’ or ‘do’ and result in ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answers.

 

6.       Can you think of two useful questions for checking understanding?

  • Please could you say a bit more about that so that I’ve understood you properly?
  • When you said… did you mean that…?

 

7.       What are three benefits of using humour with patients?

  • It can counteract stress
  • It can be very bonding between people
  • It stimulates the cardiovascular system

 

8.       Which of the following examples go beyond the acceptable boundaries of the caring relationship?

  • Giving the patient her partner’s and relatives names then discussing her private life and relationships
  • Seeing a person in your care outside normal practice
  • Visiting a patient’s home unannounced and without an appointment
  • With answer B, a member of staff disclosing that they have had successful treatment for a similar condition is usually very helpful and encouraging for patients but, as with most things, it depends on the circumstances.

 

9.       How might you sensitively end a conversation with a patient?

  • By letting them know that there will be more opportunities to talk.
  • Being mind-aware – acknowledging how the patient feels.

 

10.     What are some ways of creatively conversing with patients who have additional communication challenges?

  • Taking the lead from the other person
  • Using signs and gestures
  • Physical props e.g. books, clothes, cash
  • Doodles, simple line drawings

 

11.     Can you think of two symptoms of psychosis?

  1. Hallucinations and delusions
  2. Lack of motivation and social withdrawal

 

12.     A helpful approach and an aid to memory for staff when working with patients diagnosed with dementia is VERA: The ‘V’ stands for Validate and the ‘E’ for Emotion. What does the ‘R’ and ‘A’ stand for?

  • R= Reassure, can be as simple as saying ‘it’ll be okay’ and smiling, holding their hand
  • A= Activity, people with dementia need to feel occupied, active, see if you can engage them in some related activity

 

13.     What are some of the things that help patients with a personality disorder to feel safe and supported?

  • Building a trusting relationship with the patient
  • Being understanding and non-judgmental
  • Being mindful of possible past traumas
  • Help to alleviate their anxiety

 

14.     Which of the following can managers do to help create a great workplace?

  • Be open and transparent
  • Create a truly no-blame culture
  • Make sure staff spend most of their time doing what they are best at

 

 

 

 
 
 


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